2016-2017 Courses

Fall 2016-Summer 2017

 

Fall 2016 Academic Courses

MUSI 1310 Basic Musical Skills

3.0 credits

Lecture / Section 1 (Jeff Decker): MWF / 9:00-9:50 am / OCH 107
Class Number: 10949

Lecture / Section 2 (Justin Mueller): MWF / 10:00-10:50 am / OCH 107
Class Number: 10950

Lecture / Section 3 (Aldona Dye): MWF / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH 107
Class Number: 10951

Study of the rudiments of music and training in the ability to read music.  Prerequisite: No previous knowledge of music required.


MUSI 1993 Independent Study

1.0 - 3.0 credits
Instructor permission and instructor number required to enroll.

MUSI 2070 Popular Music: 

Karl Hagstrom Miller
3.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 9:00-9:50 am / Wilson 301
Class Number: 14423

Discussion Sections:

Section 101 (Lydia Warren): M / 11:00-11:50 / OCH 113
Class Number: 14424

Section 102 (Lydia Warren): W / 11:00-11:50 / OCH 113
Class Number: 14425

Section 103 (Lydia Warren): F / 11:00-11:50 / OCH 113
Class Number: 14426

Section 104 (Timothy Booth): M / 10:00-10:50 / OCH S008
Class Number: 14864

Section 105 (Timothy Booth): W / 11:00-11:50 / OCH S008
Class Number: 14865

Section 106 (Timothy Booth): F / 9:00-9:50 / OCH S008
Class Number: 14866

Section 107 (Rami Stucky): M / 11:00-11:50 / OCH S008
Class Number: 20907

Section 108 (Rami Stucky): W / 10:00-10:50 / OCH S008
Class Number: 20908

Section 109 (Rami Stucky): F / 11:00-11:50 / OCH S008
Class Number: 20909

The Stories We Tell about Popular Music
This lecture course on the history of popular music in the United States from the 1880s to today is organized around a series of stories or themes that seem to crop up again and again when people talk about pop music.  Each week we will explore one of these stories, the social and cultural forces behind the story, and how it functions to shape how people have heard and understood popular music. Origin stories, stories of tradition or community, stories of individual artistic creations and the factory production of pop, taste and race, becoming a star and selling out:  each have been around for a long time, but often appear new every time they arrive.  Focusing on the stories we tell about popular music can help us assess the value of the narratives we have and help us to write new ones.  It can open our ears to continuities of sound, style, and politics across time. It can tune us in to subtle differences as well.

The course will reveal how popular music intersects with business, technology, social history, and the myriad ways Americans used music in their everyday lives.  Music is beyond the grasp of words.  Its ephemeral quality – its inability to be reduced to one meaning, one word, one story – is the very reason that music can affect us so.  Tunes have reminded people who they are and declared who they hoped to become.  They built communities and tore them apart, asked forgiveness and demanded justice.  They have been shouts in the wilderness and quiet whispers of love.  Music has given pleasure by invoking the past, imagining the future, exclaiming desires, or allowing artists and audiences – for the duration of the performance – to imagine the world is just how they want it to be.  Because of this, it provides a useful and revelatory window into the history of the United States.

MUSI 2302 Keyboard Skills (Beginning)

2.0 credits, instructor permission

Lecture / Section 1 (Amy Coddington): TR / 11:00 am - 12:15 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 10953

Lecture / Section 2 (John Mayhood): TR / 12:30-1:45 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 13733

Introductory keyboard skills; includes sight-reading, improvisation, and accompaniment at the keyboard in a variety of styles. No previous knowledge of music required. Satisfies the performance requirement for music majors.


MUSI 2308 Voice Class

Pam Beasley
2.0 credits, instructor permission
Lecture: MW / 4:00-4:50 pm / OCH 107
Class Number: 14234

An introductory course to basic vocal technique; discussion to include those elements essential for healthy singing in a variety of styles. Will involve group and solo singing to apply these elements. No previous voice training or musical background required.


MUSI 2340 Learn to Groove

Robert Jospe
2.0 credits

Lecture / Section 1MW / 10:00-10:50 am / Hunter Smith Band Building
Class Number: 11596

LectureMW / 11:00-11:50 am / Hunter Smith Band Building
Class Number: 15390

"Learn to Groove" hand drumming and rhythmic fluency with Robert Jospe. This is a hands on drumming/percussion class using congas, djembes, claves, shakers, etc. This class is designed to enhance ones knowledge of syncopated patterns associated with jazz, rock, African and Latin American music and to improve ones facility in playing these patterns. This course will follow my book "Learn To Groove" and can include music students, non music students and is open to students of all skill levels. The course requires that students have or purchase a hand drum of their own. Congas, bongos, djembes, doumbeks or any other hand drums are appropriate.


MUSI 2350 Technosonics: Digital Music and Sound Art Composition

Peter Bussigel
3.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 12:00-12:50 / Maury Hall 209
Class Number: 13561

Discussion Sections:

Section 101 (Ben Robertson): M / 9:00-9:50 am / New Cabell 268
Class Number: 13562

Section 102 (Ben Robertson): M / 10:00-10:50 am / New Cabell 268
Class Number: 13563

Section 103 (Ben Robertson): M / 11:00-11:50 am / New Cabell 268
Class Number: 13564

Section 104 (Alex Christie): T / 9:30-10:20 am / New Cabell 268
Class Number: 13565

Section 105 (Alex Christie): T / 10:30-11:20 am / New Cabell 268
Class Number: 13566

Section 106 (Alex Christie): T / 11:30 am - 12:20 pm / New Cabell 268
Class Number: 13567

Section 107 (Aaron Stepp): W / 9:00-9:50 am / New Cabell 268
Class Number: 13568

Section 108 (Aaron Stepp): W / 10:00-10:50 am / New Cabell 268
Class Number: 13569

Section 109 (Aaron Stepp): W / 11:00-11:50 am / New Cabell 268
Class Number: 13570

Section 110 (Eli Stine): R / 9:30-10:20 am / New Cabell 268
Class Number: 13834

Section 111 (Eli Stine): R / 10:30-11:20 am / New Cabell 268
Class Number: 13835

Section 112 (Eli Stine): R / 11:30 am - 12:20 pm / New Cabell 268
Class Number: 13836

Section 113 (Chris Luna): F / 9:00 - 9:50 am / New Cabell 268
Class Number: 15651

Section 114 (Chris Luna): F / 10:00 - 10:50 am / New Cabell 268
Class Number: 15652

Section 115 (Chris Luna): F / 11:00 - 11:50 am / New Cabell 268
Class Number: 15653

This class (www.technosonics.net) explores the history, theory and practice of digital music and sound art. Students learn tools and techniques of music technology that inform many genres and traditions. In addition to historical and theoretical concerns, students will experiment with digital tools for musical creation.

MUSI 2559 / Section 1: Sound Studies: Anthropology and the Art of Sound Experience

Noel Lobley
2.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 10:00-10:50 am / OCH B012
Class Number: 19495

Section 101 (Caitlin Flay): M / 9:00-9:50 am / OCH B012
Class Number: 21390

Section 102 (Caitlin Flay): F / 10:00-10:50 am / OCH S008
Class Number: 21391

Section 103 (Caitlin Flay): W / 9:00-9:50 am / OCH B012
Class Number: 21392

In this new course we combine approaches from musicology, anthropology, and sound studies in order to explore and experience music, sound and artistic practice in their human (and non-human) behavioural contexts. What are the creative, ethical and social dimensions of sound art? What does music composed through animal dreams sound like? How do we imagine and hear the sounds of underwater and atmospheric anthropology? How do sound art, technology and design transform urban space and everyday social and political experience? In answering these and other questions, we investigate local and global sound cultures and trace the ways in which their sounds are sampled, remixed and circulated.

No prior musical experience is required.

MUSI 2559 / Section 2: Music, Meaning, and the Arts

Michael Puri
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 11:00-12:15 am / OCH 107
Class Number: 19497

What does music signify, and how does it convey meaning? What cultural significance has it assumed in the West, and how has this changed over time? How does its collaboration with other arts inflect both its significance and signifying ability? This lecture course seeks to answer these questions in an inquiry that focuses on Western art music from about 1800 to the present. We will examine revolutionary works by artists such as Beethoven, Wagner, and Stravinsky, alongside equally groundbreaking texts by authors such as Nietzsche, Baudelaire, and Schoenberg. By the end of this course, you should be able to speak and write about music and its role in multimedia works with greater knowledge, fluency, and imagination. Further, you should know much more about the history of Western art and art music through a direct encounter with primary sources, both verbal and sonic. This course is intended for non-music majors; no prior musical experience is required or expected.

MUSI 2559 / Section 3: Composer/Performer Collaboration

Shawn Earle
2.0 credits
Lecture: F / 9:00-10:50 am / OCH B012
Class Number: 21244

This course is for performers and composers interested in creating new music. Students enrolled in the class will collaborate with one another and will build new pieces together. The class will also intersect with the New Music Ensemble and the Percussion Ensemble, directed by I-Jen Fang. Topics will focus on how composers and performers collaborate together to build new musical repertoire. 

Students in the class may also benefit from the CCT Composition Mentoring Program. For information on joining the mentoring program which pairs CCT grad students and undergrads, please contact Eli Stine. 

Music Majors wishing to apply this class for the Music Major should plan to additionally enroll in a 1-credit independent study with professor Burtner. The combination of the independent study and the Lab will count together as one 3000-level elective requirement towards the Major.

MUSI 2600 Jazz Improvisation

John D'earth
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 3:30-5:00 pm / OCH B012
Class Number: 12912

The Jazz Improvisation Workshop explores the basic techniques and procedures for improvising in jazz and other musical contexts. No previous jazz or improvising experience is required but students must demonstrate a degree of fluency on their main instrument, an ability to read music and some familiarity with the basics of music theory. An individual interview/audition with the instructor is required before registering for this class.

MUSI 2993: Independent Study

1.0 - 3.0 credits
Instructor permission and instructor number required to enroll.


MUSI 3040 Studies in 20th and 21st-Century Music

Joel Rubin
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 11:00-12:15 / OCH B012
Class Number: 15518

Want to learn why people were beating each other up in the aisles at the premiere of Stravinsky’s Rite of Spring? Why Schoenberg’s music is still avant-garde over a century after it’s creation? How the Jazz Age influenced classical music and vice versa? How folk and world musical traditions influenced classical music? What happened to the music under totalitarian regimes? How art movements like Dadaism and Minimalism influenced the direction of music? Why Boulez declared Schoenberg to be dead, and why he and his colleagues were later termed “fascists”? How did post-war music and electronic influence the Beatles and other pop musicians, and how did pop music and jazz feed into the development of minimalism? What is the place of women, and African-American and other minority composers in contemporary music? How did improvisation and Zen Buddhism influence John Cage and other post-war composers? Is John Zorn’s music classical, jazz or something else? And how on earth did Cage land a spot on “I’ve Got a Secret” or the US Navy band end up performing arrangements of Zorn? We cover that and more!

MUSI 3040, Studies in Twentieth and Twenty-first Century Music, offers insight into understanding the complex developments in Western art music from the turn of the 20th century to the present. We will study numerous compositional movements, composers and their works, looking at aspects such as compositional and performance style and techniques within the broader framework of social, cultural and political movements of the time. We will also read what the composers themselves and other writers from the time said about the music. The goal is to help you form your own opinions and interpretations of the music—not only of the examples that we study in class, but of the many others that you may encounter both during and after this class as performers, composers and/or listeners. While the course materials focus primarily on the Euro-American situation, we will also examine developments more globally, drawing on developments in popular, jazz, folk and world musical traditions.

Fulfills part of the 'Critical and comparative studies in music' requirement for majors. Prerequisite: MUSI 3310

MUSI 3050 Music and Discourse

3.0 credits
Fred Maus
Lecture: MWF / 1:00-1:50 / OCH 113
Class Number: 13838

Studies the range of music that has flourished in the twentieth century, including modernist and post-modern art music, popular music, and world music, through historical, critical, and ethnographic approaches.


MUSI 3070 Intro to Musical Ethnography

Nomita Dave
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 3:30-4:45 pm, OCH 107
Class Number: 19696

This course explores ways of examining and representing music and sound as a fundamentally social practice. Such an approach looks beyond the notes to study music as part of human social life and experience. Readings and listenings will focus on a number of contexts from throughout the world, including Portuguese fado songs, rainforest soundscapes, and urban street dance in the U.S. We will consider in-depth the theories and methods involved in conducting research and writing about sound and music as social phenomena, considering the roles and perspectives of musicians, listeners, markets and the media. We will also examine the role of the researcher, considering the ethical issues involved in representing music and culture, both from elsewhere and ‘at home’. Students will apply the methods we discuss in class in a final project on music-making and –listening in and around Charlottesville.


MUSI 3310 Theory I

3.0 credits

Lecture / Section 2 (Fred Maus): MWF / 10:00-10:50 / OCH 113
Class Number: 10956

Lecture / Section 3 (Scott DeVeaux): MWF / 11:00-11:50 / OCH B012
Class Number: 10957

Lecture / Section 3 (Kevin Davis): MWF / 9:00-9:50 / OCH 113
Class Number: 21382

Studies pitch and formal organization in European concert music of the 18th and 19th centuries. Includes four-part vocal writing, 18th-century style keyboard accompaniment, key relations, and form. Students compose numerous short passages of music and study significant compositions by period composers.


MUSI 3332 and 3334 Musicianship I and II

2.0 credit

These lab courses give practical experience with many aspects of musical perception, performance, and creation. These will include sight-reading and sight-singing; dictation of melody, rhythm, and harmony; aural identification of intervals, chords, and rhythmic patterns; and exercises in musical memory and improvisation. Students entering the sequence take a test to determine the appropriate level of their first course. At the end of each course, students take a placement test to determine whether they may enter a higher level course. Courses may be repeated for credit, but each course may be counted toward the major only once.


MUSI 3332 Musicianship I

Lecture / Section 1 (Adam Carter): MWF / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH 107
Class Number: 10959

Lecture / Section 2 (Tracey Stewart): MWF / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 10958

Lecture / Section 3 (Victoria Clark): MWF / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH B012
Class Number: 18759


MUSI 3334 Musicianship II

Lecture (Kyle Chattleton): MWF / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH S008
Class Number: 15391


MUSI 3370 Songwriting

Ted Coffey
3.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 2:00-3:15 pm / OCH B012
Class Number: 13839

The goal of this course is to delve into songwriting; to develop your aural, analytic and creative abilities and to join them together in understanding and composing songs. You will learn about rhythm, melodic design, harmonic progression, lyrics and song forms. You will also work on eartraining, so that concepts you learn will be sonically meaningful. We will consider examples from a broad musical spectrum: blues, folk, tin pan alley, musicals, R & B, rock & roll, hip hop. We will also discuss the issues that songwriters encounter. You will have the opportunity to suggest songs for study, and some assignments will be done in groups. In these situations, we will organize groups that have complementary abilities for in-class performances. The Lab is a required part of the class, and you must sign up for a lab section. During the lab you will go over concepts we are covering in class, as well as work on additional eartraining, analysis and creative projects.

MUSI 3390 Introduction to Music and Computers

Luke Dahl
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 9:30-10:45 am / OCH B012
Class Number: 10960

Discussion Sections:

Section 101 (Jon Bellona): F / 11:00-11:50am / B011
Class Number: 10962

Section 102 (Jon Bellona): F / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH B011
Class Number: 10961

Section 103 (Jon Bellona): F / 1:00-1:50 pm / OCH B011
Class Number: 10963

Introduction to Music and Computers is an upper-level introductory course in music technology. Students gain theoretical, historical and practical knowledge of electronic and computer music. An emphasis is placed on creative hands-on experience composing music via digital technologies. Theoretical and practical topics include acoustics, recording, editing and mixing, MIDI, sound synthesis, and audio DSP. Students learn a host of skills and technologies useful for working with digital audio.

3390 fulfills the composition requirement of the Music Major.  This is a composition class and key assignments are creative in nature. Note that you MUST register for the Lab (0 credits) as well as the course. 

MUSI 3559 Making Art in/with Communities

Peter Bussigel
3.0 credits
Lecture: T / 4:00-4:50 & R / 4:00-6:00 / CAM 425
Class Number: 20087

What do we mean by community art? How can site-specific performance be used as a platform for social change? Is art-making a right or a privilege? This year-long, practice-driven course exposes students to the intersections of collective art-making and civic engagement. After careful consideration of the history, ethics, and organizational structures of community engaged art practices, we will work collaboratively with a designated community to design and implement art projects and programming. Drawing largely from site-specific performance and art practices, we will develop context-specific approaches to art-making that provide a platform for sharing community concerns.

MUSI 3993 Independent Study

1.0-3.0 credits
Instructor permission and instructor number required to enroll.


MUSI 4331 Theory III

Michael Puri
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 2:00-3:15 pm / OCH B012
Class Number: 10965

Studies in 18th-, 19th-, and 20th-century techniques and styles through analysis and composition. Prerequisite: MUSI 3320 or instructor permission.

MUSI 4507 Composers
Topic: Minimal Music: Drone- & Loop-Based Composition since 1960

Victor Szabo
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 12:30-1:45 / OCH 107
Class Number: 19274

This class explores the history and aesthetics of the drone and loop in Western music since 1960. We will study music by “minimalist” composers such as La Monte Young, Terry Riley, Steve Reich, Philip Glass, Meredith Monk, John Adams, Julius Eastman, Eliane Radigue, and Arvo Pärt. We will also explore the cultural history and aesthetics of drone- and loop-based popular musics such as hip hop, ambient, and EDM. Readings and discussions will address such questions as: What cultural and technological factors played a role in the genesis of “minimalism” in the 1960s? How might one compare minimal music with minimalist sculpture or painting? How did these composers engage African and Asian practices and philosophies? And how do we explain the connections between minimal music and dance, meditation, and trance? In addition to weekly assignments, students will undertake one major project (research, analysis, performance, or composition) of their choosing.

Pre-requisite: MUSI 1310 or 3310 or basic music theory.

MUSI 4519 Critical Studies of Music
Topic: Soundscapes: Music and the Environment

Noel Lobley
3.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 1:00-2:15 pm / OCH S008
Class Number: 15392

Water drumming, desert songlines and honk-horn orchestras. Microphones, sound archives, and melting glaciers. Resonant rainforests, acoustic niche theory, and inter-species music-making. How do people, music and sound express, conserve and perform the environment? Combining interdisciplinary approaches from ecomusicology, soundscape ecology, sensory ethnography and composition, we will consider why studying contemporary and historical soundscapes through the lenses of heritage, conservation, sustainability and activism links us to some of the biggest threats facing the environment today.

MUSI 4533 Advanced Musicianship

Michael Slon
2.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 2:00-2:50 pm / OCH B012
Class Number: 18761

 

MUSI 4535 Mobile Interactive Computer Ensemble (MICE)

Peter Bussigel
3.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 6:00-7:15 / OCH B011
Class Number: 20093

Mobile Interactive Computer Ensemble (MICE) is an advanced seminar in composition, software programming and intermedia performance. The class explores the theoretical and practical aspects of composing and performing real-time interactive multimedia with computers. Emphasis is placed on gaining a deeper and more personal understanding of the possibilities of human-computer interaction in music and the arts. Students in the class form the Mobile Interactive Computer Ensemble (MICE) and create new works for the group to perform. Musicians are encouraged to join MICE, and this class meets a composition requirement for the Music Major. Creative and technology-oriented students from the other Arts Departments and Engineering are also encouraged to join the class as we will focus on intermedia approaches to live performance with technology.

MUSI 4543 Sound Studio

Ted Coffey
3.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 3:30-4:45 / OCH B011
Class Number: 18762

Discussion Sections:

Section 101 (Ryan Maguire): TBA / OCH B011
Class Number: 21245

Pre-requisite: MUSI-3390, Permission of the Instructor

This upper-level seminar explores experimental techniques in sound recording, processing, mixing, and music production generally. The course assumes proficiency with DAWs, including experience using basic, commercial effects such as EQ, compression, and time-based effects. We will use MaxMSP (https://cycling74.com/products/max/) to create custom applications for playing with sound. Participants will find past experience with MaxMSP, other sound synthesis software languages, and-or programming / scripting languages helpful; however, willingness to embrace MaxMSP and thinking algorithmically will suffice. Beyond this technological focus, we will look at the role of instrumental performance in sound design — particularly experimental and so-called extended technique. Listening and reading assignments will complement weekly creative projects. Creative work will culminate in a final portfolio of sound design and songs.

MUSI 4559 Designing New Musical Instruments: Sound Synthesis & Control

Luke Dahl
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 3:30-4:45 / B011
Class Number: 15575

New Interfaces for Musical Expression (NIME) is a growing field that explores technologies for performing music. NIME is interdisciplinary, incorporating perspectives from music, sculpture, engineering, human-computer interaction (HCI), and design. Starting in the Fall, we will offer a two-course sequence on designing, building, and performing with new musical interfaces. MUSI 4559 is the first class in this sequence.

This class will cover the basic skills needed for building new musical interfaces. We will learn real-time digital sound synthesis and use sensors to measure users’ movements as control data.  The class is primarily project based, and we will prototype a number of new musical instruments to explore different types of synthesis and interaction.  We will use microcontrollers and single-board computers to embed electronics within various physical form-factors. Some experience with music and technology is expected.

MUSI 4710 Instrumental Conducting I

Kate Tamarkin
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 2:00-3:15 / OCH 113
Class Number: 14434

 

MUSI 4993: Independent Study

1.0 - 3.0 credits
Instructor permission and instructor number required to enroll

 

Fall 2016 Graduate Courses


MUSI 7511 Current Studies in Research and Criticism

Richard Will
3.0 credits 
Lecture: T / 2:00-4:30 pm / OCH S008
Class Number: 11470

 

MUSI 7512 Studies in Jazz

Scott DeVeaux
3.0 credits 
Lecture: R / 2:00-4:30 pm / OCH S008
Class Number: TBA

 

MUSI 7524 Field Research/Ethnography

Michelle Kisliuk
3.0 credits
Lecture: W / 2:30-5:00 pm / OCH S008
Class Number: 18765

 

MUSI 7547 Materials of Contemporary Music

Matthew Burtner
3.0 credits
LectureT / 2:00-4:30 /OCH  B011
Class Number: 18766

 

MUSI 7583 Proseminar in Composition

Judith Shatin
3.0 credits 
Lecture: M / 3:15-5:45 pm / OCH Wilson 134
Class Number: 14435

 

MUSI 7582 Composition

3.0 credits


MUSI 8820: Advanced Composition

3.0 credits


MUSI 8840: Advanced Composition

3.0 credits


MUSI 8910: Supervised Research

3.0 credits
Reading and/or other work in particular fields under supervision of an instructor. Normally taken by first-year graduate students.


MUSI 8920: Supervised Research

3.0 credits


MUSI 8960: Thesis

3.0 credits


MUSI 8993: Independent Study

1.0-3.0 credits
Independent study dealing with a specific topic. Requirements will place primary emphasis on independent research.


MUSI 8998: Non-topical Research

3.0-12.0 credits


MUSI 8999: Non-topical Research

3.0-12.0 credits


MUSI 9010: Directed Readings

3.0 credits


MUSI 9910: Supervised Research

3.0 credits
Reading and/or other work in particular fields under supervision of an instructor. Normally taken by second year graduate students.


MUSI 9920: Supervised Research

3.0 credits


MUSI 9940: Independent Research

3.0 credits
Research carried out by graduate student in consultation with an instructor.


MUSI 9998: Non-topical Research

3.0-12.0 credits
Preliminary research directed towards a dissertation in consultation with an instructor.


MUSI 9999: Non-Topical Research

3.0-12.0 credits
Preliminary research directed towards a dissertation in consultation with an instructor.

 

Fall 2016 Ensembles

MUBD 2610, 2620, 2630 and 2640: Marching Band I-IV

Bill Pease
2.0 credits
Lecture: TRF / 6:00-8:20 pm / Hunter Smith Band Building

MUBD 2610
Class Number: 10873

MUBD 2620
Class Number: 10874

MUBD 2630 
Class Number: 10875

MUBD 2640
Class Number: 10876

The Cavalier Marching Band is open to all students at the University of Virginia by audition. The band is comprised of members from nearly every major at UVA. A normal practice schedule is twice a week, with additional Friday practices on home game weeks.  Attendance is mandatory at our band camp in August. There are no fees to be in the Cavalier marching Band. IF you are interested please contact the band office at 434.982.5347 or email William Pease .

MUEN 2690, 3690 and 4690 African Music and Dance Ensemble

Michelle Kisliuk
2.0 credits
Lecture: R / 5:00-6:30 pm / OCH 107

(registration number depends on student seniority in the ensemble)

MUEN 2690
Class Number: 15674

MUEN 3690
Class Number: 15675

MUEN 4690
Class Number: 15676

The African Music and Dance Ensemble is a practical, hands-on course focusing on several music/dance forms from Western and Central Africa with performances during and at the end of the semester. Though no previous experience with music or dance is required, we will give special attention to developing tight ensemble dynamics, aural musicianship, and a polymetric sensibility. Concentration, practice, and faithful attendance are required of each class member, the goal being to develop an ongoing U.Va. African Music and Dance Ensemble.

MUEN 3600 Jazz Ensemble

John D'earth
2.0 credits
Lecture: MR / 7:30-9:30 pm / OCH B018
Class Number: 10877

Led by internationally recognized jazz trumpeter/composer John D'earth, the Jazz Ensemble is a full-sized jazz big band, whose focus includes “head arrangements” group improvisation, world music and original compositions from within the band, along with music ranging from swing to bop to fusion. You'll gain valuable experience in ensemble playing and in the art of solo improvisation, and may take private instruction in jazz improvisation, perform in small combos and participate in jazz workshops held by such major figures as Michael Brecker, John Abercrombi, Dave Leibman, Bob Moses, Clark Terry, and Joe Henderson.

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

MUEN 3610: Charlottesville Symphony at the University of Virginia

Kate Tamarkin, Conductor
2.0 credits

Strings

Lecture / Section 100: W / 7:30-10:00 pm / OCH 101
Class Number: 10878

Sectionals: M / 5:30-7:00 pm

Section 101: Pete Spaar (Double Bass) / OCH B012
Class Number: 10880

Section 102: Adam Carter (Cello) / OCH S004
Class Number: 10881

Section 103: Ayn Balija (Viola) / OCH 113
Class Number: 10882

Section 104: Daniel Sender (Violin) / OCH 107
Class Number: 10883

Section 105: David Sariti (Violin) / OCH B018
Class Number: 10884

Brass / Woodwinds / Percussion

Lecture / Section 200: W / 7:30-10:00 pm / OCH 101
Class Number: 10879

Sectionals: W / 5:15-6:15 pm

Section 201: Elizabeth Roberts (Bassoon) / TBA
Class Number: 10888

Section 202: Katy Ambrose (Horn) / OCH 113
Class Number: 10886

Section 203: Kelly Peral (Oboe) / TBA
Class Number: 10889 

Section 204: Shawn Earle (Clarinet) / TBA
Class Number: 10885

Section 205: Kelly Sulick (Flute) / OCH B019
Class Number: 10887

Section 206: Nate Lee (Trombone) / B012
Class Number: 10892

Section 207: Rachel Duncan (Trumpet) / 107
Class Number: 10891

Section 208:  I-Jen Fang (Percussion) / B018
Class Number: 10890

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

MUEN 3620 Wind Ensemble

Bill Pease
2.0 credits
Lecture: M / 6:45-9:00 pm / Hunter Smith Band Building / Room 200
Class Number: 11399

The Wind Ensemble is a 45-member ensemble that features the most outstanding brass, woodwind, and percussion players at the University. The focus of this ensemble is to explore new literature as well as perform the masterworks of the wind band era. The wind ensemble also works with outstanding guest performers and conductors. This group is predominately made up of non-music majors who enjoy the genre of the wind band. Open to all University of Virginia students, auditions are held prior to the start of each semester. For more information on the Wind Ensemble, please visit our webpage at: http://music.virginia.edu/wind-ensemble.

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

MUEN 3630, Section 3: Flute Ensemble

Kelly Sulick
1.0 credit
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 10893

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

MUEN 3630, Section 4: Woodwind Ensemble

Elizabeth Roberts
1.0 credit
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 10896

Explore, rehearse and perform woodwind chamber music, including both standard and more obscure works. Focus on developing chamber music playing skills, learning the tendencies of the woodwind instruments, developing musicianship, and enjoying making and sharing music! Instructor permission and audition required.

MUEN 3630, Section 5: Trombone Ensemble

Nate Lee
1.0 credit
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 10898

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition. Contact Nathaniel Lee to schedule an audition.

MUEN 3630, Section 8: Horn Ensemble

Katy Ambrose
1.0 credit
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 10897

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

MUEN 3630, Section 9: Percussion Chamber Ensemble

I-Jen Fang
1.0 credit
Lecture: T / 9:30-10:50 am / OCH B018
Class Number: 10900

Restricted to Instructor permission by audition on first day of class.

Re-established in spring 2005 by I-Jen Fang, principal timpanist and percussionist with Charlottesville Symphony, the Percussion Ensemble is a chamber group that performs literature ranging from classical transcriptions to contemporary music. The ensemble draws upon a large family of pitched and non-pitched percussion instruments, and the number of players and amount of equipment varies greatly from piece to piece. Music reading skills and basic percussion technique on all percussion instruments is required. Previous percussion ensemble experience is highly recommended. If you are interested in joining please contact I-Jen Fang.

MUEN 3630, Section 15: Brass Quintet

Rachel Duncan
1.0 credit
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 10899

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

MUEN 3630, Section 24: Woodwind Quintet

Shawn Earle
1.0 credit
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: TBA

Instructor permission by audition.

MUEN 3630, Chamber Music Ensemble

1.0 credit, Instructor permission by audition.

Lecture: / Section 1: Daniel Sender / TBA
Class Number: 10895

Lecture: / Section 17: Ayn Balija / TBA
Class Number: 10903

Lecture: / Section 18: David Sariti / TBA
Class Number: 10904

Lecture: / Section 20: Adam Carter / TBA
Class Number: 10905

Lecture: / Section 23: John Mayhood / TBA
Class Number: 12007

MUEN 3630: Jazz Chamber Ensemble

1.0 credit, Instructor permission by audition.

Lecture / Section 7: Pete Spaar / R / 5:30-7:00 pm / OCH B018
Class Number: 10901

Lecture / Section 12: Pete Spaar / F / 12:30-2:00 pm / OCH B018
Class Number: 10902

Lecture / Section 21: Jeff Decker / T / 5:30-7:00 pm / OCH B018
Class Number: 11597

Lecture / Section 22: Mike Rosensky / F / 2:00-3:30 pm / OCH B018
Class Number: 11598

MUEN 3640: Klezmer Ensemble

Joel Rubin
2.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 7:30-9:30 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 14436

Klezmer, originally the ritual and celebratory music of the Yiddish-speaking Jews of Eastern Europe, was brought to North America by immigrants around the turn of the last century. Since the 1970s, a dynamic revival of this tradition has been taking place in America and beyond. Klezmer’s recent popularity has brought it far from its roots in medieval minstrelsy and Jewish ritual and into the sphere of mainstream culture. The traditional klezmer style presents the experienced instrumentalist with a range of technical challenges with its characteristic note bends, rubati, Baroque-style embellishments and other micro-improvisational techniques, opening up a world of expressive possibilities not available to them from either classical music or jazz. This music was passed on orally from generation to generation, and many of the ornaments which are so integral to the klezmer sound can only be approximated by Western staff notation – not to mention the patterns of improvised variation which are the cornerstone of the style. There will therefore be an emphasis on learning by ear as much as possible, but we will be using music in the form of lead sheets and other written instructional materials to supplement sound examples.

The class focuses on the study and performance of various traditions, including the klezmer traditions of New York between the two world wars, 19th century Eastern Europe, as well as original contemporary compositions. Emphasis will be on learning by ear, improvisation within a modal context, and learning to develop a cohesive ensemble sound. Concentration, practice, and good attendance are required of each ensemble member.

Admission is by audition during first class period of semester or prior to that, by appointment with the instructor.

MUEN 3645: Bluegrass Workshop

Richard Will
1.0 credit, Instructor permission
Lecture: T / 7:00-8:00 pm / OCH 107
Class Number: TBA

This course seeks to develop the playing, singing, and improvising skills necessary for the idomatic performance of bluegrass music, while also providing an opportunity for discussion of its origins and development.  Appropriate for experienced players working to improve their knowledge or for players versed in other genres to learn new styles.

MUEN 3650: University Singers

Michael Slon
2.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 3:30-5:30 pm / OCH 101
Class Number: 10907

The University Singers is the University's premier SATB ensemble, performing a cappella and accompanied choral literature ranging from chant to the works of contemporary composers. Past repertoire has included Bach's Mass in B minor, Orff's Carmina Burana, the Duruflé Requiem, and Bernstein's Chichester Psalms, as well as shorter a cappella works. Recent trips have taken the group to Atlanta, Charlotte, Chicago, Cincinnati, New Orleans, New York City, Philadelphia, and the National Cathedral in Washington D.C., as well as the campuses of other American universities for collaborative concerts. The group has also been heard on European tours in England, Italy, Belgium, Germany, and Switzerland. Recent highlights have included performances with the Charlottesville Symphony at the University of Virginia, a concert and workshop with Bobby McFerrin, and a concert tour of the Southeastern U.S.

Students in the University Singers come from all six of UVA's undergraduate schools, including Arts and Sciences, Education, and Engineering, as well as several of the University's graduate and professional schools. Together, they enjoy an esprit de corps that arises from the pursuit of musical excellence and the camaraderie the singers develop offstage.

All singers at the University - undergraduates, graduate students, staff, and faculty are encouraged to audition. University Singers is offered for two hours academic credit. Michael Slon, who has conducted choruses at the Oberlin Conservatory and Indiana University School of Music, is the conductor. For more information on the University Singers, please visit our webpage

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

MUEN 3651: Chamber Singers

Michael Slon
2.0 credits
Lecture: F / 1:00-3:15 pm / OCH 107
Class Number: 10906

Chamber Singers is a select ensemble drawn from the University Singers. The ensemble meets once a week and focuses on music for chamber choir ranging from the Renaissance to contemporary pieces. Recent performances have included the Monteverdi Mass for 4 voices (1651), Britten'sHymn to St. Cecilia, and Bach's Cantata 150, as well as contemporary works by Meredith Monk and Eric Whitacre, and arrangements of classic jazz standards by Harold Arlen, Jerome Kern, and the King's Singers. Interested singers will be considered for the chamber ensemble as part of their University Singers audition. For more information, please visit our webpage.

Restricted to: Instructor permission

MUEN 3670: Early Music Ensemble: Baroque Orchestra

David Sariti
2.0 credit
Lecture: R / 7:00-9:00 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 11471

The Baroque Orchestra, directed by David Sariti, offers students the rare opportunity to perform music of the 17th and 18th centuries on the instruments for which it was written, at low pitch. Students use period instruments from the University's extensive collection, receiving personal instruction on the special techniques necessary, and must be accomplished on their modern counterparts.

MUEN 3680: New Music Ensemble

I-Jen Fang
1.0 credit
Lecture: R / 3:30-5:30 pm / OCH B018
Class Number: 10908

Restricted to Instructor permission by audition on first day of class.

Performance of vocal and instrumental music of the twentieth century.

A one-credit course at the University of Virginia, the New Music Ensemble explores and performs exciting music of our time. The ensemble consists of dedicated instrumentalists, singers and UVa performance faculty. We perform a wide variety of contemporary music suitable to our instrumentation, including new works created by UVa composers.

The New Music Ensemble seeks dedicated instrumentalists and singers to explore and perform a wide variety of contemporary music. To audition, come to the first class with your instrument. If you are interested in joining please contact I-Jen Fang.

Open to UVA students, community musicians and advanced high school students.

 

Spring 2017 Academic Courses

MUSI 1010 Introduction to Music

Richard Will
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 9:30-10:20 pm / Gilmer 190
Class Number: 13641

Discussion Sections:

Section 101 (Justin Mueller): F / 9:00-9:50 am / OCH S008r4
Class Number: 13642

Section 102 (Justin Mueller): F / 10:00-10:50 am / OCH S008
Class Number: 13643

Section 103 (Justin Mueller): F / 11:00-11:50 pm / OCH S008
Class Number: 13644

What is music?  How does it work?  Why do we listen to it?  We will study numerous examples, focusing on Western "classical" music, opera, religious music, musical theater, and film music.  We will discuss all the activities that make up the experience of music, including but not limited to composing, improvising, dancing, performing, recording, marketing, selling, listening, and watching.   We will ask how music shapes identities, our own and those of many different communities from the 18th century to the present.  The goal is to help you form your own informed opinions about music, not just the examples on the syllabus but any music you may encounter.  No musical experience necessary.


MUSI 1310 Basic Musical Skills

3.0 credits

Lecture / Section 1 (Jeff Decker): MWF / 9:00-9:50 am / OCH 107
Class Number: 10867

Lecture / Section 2 (Aaron Stepp): MWF / 10:00-10:50 am / OCH 107
Class Number: 10868

Lecture / Section 3 (Kyle Chattleton): MWF / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH 107
Class Number: 10866

Lecture / Section 4 (Victor Szabo): MWF / 12:00-12:50 am / OCH 107
Class Number: 21440

Study of the rudiments of music and training in the ability to read music.  Prerequisite: No previous knowledge of music required.

MUSI 1620 History of the Wind Band

William Pease
2.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 11:00-11:50 pm / Hunter Smith Band Building
Class Number: 19878

The class is designed to give an introductory look at wind band music development from the early 20th century to present. The class does not require any previous musical experience.  The course provides students with historical facts surrounding the wind band movement while allowing students to experience the music aurally.

MUSI 1993 Independent Study

1.0 - 3.0 credits
Instructor permission and instructor number required to enroll.


MUSI 2070 Popular Music

Noel Lobley
3.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 12:00-12:50 am / Maury 209
Class Number: 13997

Discussion Sections:

Section 101 (Tracey Stewart): T / 9:30-10:20 am / OCH S008
Class Number: 13998

Section 102 (Tracey Stewart): T / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH S008
Class Number: 13999

Section 103 (Tracey Stewart): T / 12:30-1:20 pm / OCH S008
Class Number: 14000

Section 104 (Timothy Booth): R / 9:30-10:20 am / OCH S008
Class Number: 14001

Section 105 (Timothy Booth): R / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH S008
Class Number: 14002

Section 106 (Timothy Booth): R / 12:30-1:20 pm / OCH S008
Class Number: 14003

Section 107 (Ryan Maguire): T / 9:30-10:20 am / OCH 107
Class Number: 14689

Section 108 (Ryan Maguire): T / 11:00-11:50 am / Pavilion VIII 103
Class Number: 14690

Section 109 (Ryan Maguire): T / 2:00-2:50 pm/ OCH 113
Class Number: 14691

Section 110 (Rami Stucky): R / 9:30-10:20 am / OCH 107
Class Number: 14805

Section 111 (Rami Stucky): R / 2:00-2:50 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 14806

Section 112 (Rami Stucky): R / 12:30-1:20 pm / OCH 107
Class Number: 14807

Scholarly and critical study of music circulated through mass media. Specific topic for the semester (e.g. world popular music, bluegrass, country music, hip-hop, Elvis Presley) announced in advance. No previous knowledge of music required.

Love, fame and money; heartbreak, obscurity and the rise and fall of immense industries. Popular musics touch, move, drive and become almost everyone on the planet, and yet how do we study the songs and sounds we hear everywhere and everyday. What makes music popular? Why do we like music? What identities, values and messages do we share through popular music?

In this course we will connect a dizzying range of popular music genres –from rock to reggae, from global hip hop to country, from EDM to love ballads – tracing fascinating stories that inevitably link love and temptation, money and crime, dreams and death.

Our special topics will include a close look at global hip hop, global rock, and the rise and fall of the recording industries.


MUSI 2302 Keyboard Skills (Beginning)

2.0 credits, instructor permission

Lecture / Section 1 (Caitlin Flay): TR / 11:00 am - 12:15 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 11452

Lecture / Section 2 (Caitlin Flay): TR / 9:30-10:45 am / OCH 113
Class Number: 13450

Introductory keyboard skills; includes sight-reading, improvisation, and accompaniment at the keyboard in a variety of styles. No previous knowledge of music required. Satisfies the performance requirement for music majors.


MUSI 2304 Keyboard Skills (Intermediate)

John Mayhood
2.0 credits, instructor permission
Lecture: TR / 12:30-1:45 pm / OCH 113
Class Number:  11453

Intermediate keyboard skills for students with some previous musical experience. Satisfies the performance requirement for music majors. Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.


MUSI 2306 Fretboard Harmony

Mike Rosensky
2.0 credits, Instructor Permission
Lecture: MWF / 1:00-1:50 / OCH B012
Class Number: 11454

The level of this course will vary, anywhere from beginning to advanced, each semester depending on the guitar experience of students who enroll. Students should contact Mike Rosensky (mlr5q@virginia.edu) during pre-registration letting him know of their interest in the course and of their intent to show up for the first class of the semester when the level and the make-up of the class will be ultimately determined.

In Fretboard Harmony a theory-based approach will be taken to understanding how musical materials (scales, arpeggios, chord voicings) "fit" on the guitar. The majority of class meeting time is spent with guitars in hand "drilling" new material. Practice methods will be explored, with an emphasis on learning how to practice effectively and efficiently.


MUSI 2340 Learn to Groove

Robert Jospe
2.0 credits
LectureMW / 10:00-10:50 am / OCH B018
Class Number: 13121

"Learn to Groove" hand drumming and rhythmic fluency with Robert Jospe. This is a hands on drumming/percussion class using congas, djembes, claves, shakers, etc. This class is designed to enhance ones knowledge of syncopated patterns associated with jazz, rock, African and Latin American music and to improve ones facility in playing these patterns. This course will follow my book "Learn To Groove" and can include music students, non music students and is open to students of all skill levels. The course requires that students have or purchase a hand drum of their own. Congas, bongos, djembes, doumbeks or any other hand drums are appropriate.


MUSI 2342 Learn to Groove Intermediate

Robert Jospe
2.0 credits
LectureMW / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH B018
Class Number: 14418

"Learn to Groove" hand drumming and rhythmic fluency with Robert Jospe. This is the intermediate level of the class. It is a hands on drumming/percussion class using congas, djembes, claves, shakers, etc. This class is designed to enhance ones knowledge of syncopated patterns associated with jazz, rock, African and Latin American music and to improve ones facility in playing these patterns.


MUSI 2370 Making Rock

Ted Coffey
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 3:30-4:20 pm / Maury 104
Class Number: 15021

Discussion Sections:

Section 101 (Ben Robertson): W / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH B011
Class Number: 15022

Section 102 (Ben Robertson): W / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH B011
Class Number: 15023

Section 103 (Ben Robertson): W / 1:00-1:50 pm / OCH B011
Class Number: 15024

Section 104 (Alex Christie): M / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH B011
Class Number: 19880

Section 105 (Alex Christie): M / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH B011
Class Number: 19881

Section 106 (Alex Christie): M / 1:00-1:50 pm / OCH B011
Class Number: 19882

An introduction to rock from the 1950's to the present, comprising musical, cultural and technological histories and compositional projects, informed by the points of view and poetic processes of their makers. The course is organized around musical and poetic foundations such as the backbeat, affect, control vs. abandon, distortion, production, the solo, and lyric innovation. Creative assignments involve producing musical expressions of rock.


MUSI 2559 Composer/Performer Collaboration

Shawn Earle
2.0 credits
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: TBA

This course is for performers and composers interested in creating new music. Students enrolled in the class will collaborate with one another and will build new pieces together. The class will also intersect with the New Music Ensemble and the Percussion Ensemble, directed by I-Jen Fang. Topics will focus on how composers and performers collaborate together to build new musical repertoire. 

Students in the class may also benefit from the CCT Composition Mentoring Program. For information on joining the mentoring program which pairs CCT grad students and undergrads, please contact Eli Stine. 

Music Majors wishing to apply this class for the Music Major should plan to additionally enroll in a 1-credit independent study with professor Burtner. The combination of the independent study and the Lab will count together as one 3000-level elective requirement towards the Major.

MUSI 2600 Jazz Improvisation

John D'earth
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 3:30-5:00 pm / OCH B012
Class Number: 12285

The Jazz Improvisation Workshop explores the basic techniques and procedures for improvising in jazz and other musical contexts. No previous jazz or improvising experience is required but students must demonstrate a degree of fluency on their main instrument, an ability to read music and some familiarity with the basics of music theory. An individual interview/audition with the instructor is required before registering for this class.


MUSI 2993: Independent Study

1.0 - 3.0 credits
Instructor permission and instructor number required to enroll.

MUSI 3020 Studies in 17th- & 18th-Century Music

Richard Will
4.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 2:00-3:15 pm / OCH B012
Class Number: 19883

MUSI 3050 Music and Discourse

3.0 credits

Lecture / Section 1 (Karl Miller): MWF / 10:00-10:50 / OCH B012
Class Number: 10879

Lecture / Section 2 (Amy Coddington): MWF / 1:00-1:50 / OCH 113
Class Number: 14004

Studies the range of music that has flourished since the end  of the 19th century including modernist and post-modern art music, popular music, and world music, through historical, critical, and ethnographic approaches. Prerequisite: The ability to read music, or any three-credit course in music, or instructor permission.

MUSI 3090 Performance in Africa

Michelle Kisliuk
4.0 credits
Seminar: T / 3:30-5:00 pm / OCH 107
Class Number: 13452

Lab Section:

Section 101 (Lydia Warren): TR / 5:30-7:15 pm / OCH 107
Class Number: 13584

Explores performance in Africa through reading, discussion, audio and video examples, and hands-on practice. Tuesday afternoon (4:00-5:10) is the seminar meeting,  then the course meets together on Tu/Thu the evening with African Music and Dance Ensemble.* Students in Music 3090 are automatically part of the current semester's UVA African Music and Dance Ensemble. Your role in the Ensemble as learner and performer is crucial to your overall work in the course (also see description for MUEN 3690).

We will explore African music/dance styles, their sociomusical circumstances and processes, as well as performed resistances and responses to the colonial and post/neo-colonial encounter. In addition, we will address the politics and processes involved in translating performance practices from one cultural context to another. Each student's personal relationship to the material/experience will be integrated into study.

Readings, discussions, and written work will focus heavily on topics and issues related to the main music/dance traditions that we are learning to perform this semester, though we may venture beyond those areas from time to time. The course will explore both "traditional" and "popular" styles, leading us to question those categories. As we near the end of the semester, our discussions will focus in part on issues and planning around our ensemble concert in April.


MUSI 3310 Theory I

3.0 credits

Lecture / Section 1 (Aldona Dye): MWF / 9:00-9:50 am / OCH B012
Class Number: 13645

Lecture / Section 2 (Stephanie Doktor): MWF / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH B012
Class Number: 14427

Studies the pitch and rhythmic aspects of several musical styles, including European art music, blues, African drumming, and popular music. Focuses on concepts and notation related to scales and modes, harmony, meter, form, counterpoint, and style. Prerequisite:  Ability to read music, and familiarity with basic concepts of pitch intervals and scales.


MUSI 3320 Theory II

3.0 credits

Lecture / Section 1 (Fred Maus): MWF / 11:00-11:50 am / OCH 113
Class Number: 19884

Lecture / Section 2 (Victor Szabo): MWF / 10:00-10:50 am / OCH 113
Class Number: 10880

Studies pitch and formal organization in European concert music of the 18th and 19th centuries. Includes four-part vocal writing, 18th-century style keyboard accompaniment, key relations, and form. Students compose numerous short passages of music and study significan compositions by period composers.

Prerequisite: MUSI 3310 or instructor permission.


MUSI 3332 and 3334 Musicianship I and II

2.0 credit

These lab courses give practical experience with many aspects of musical perception, performance, and creation. These will include sight-reading and sight-singing; dictation of melody, rhythm, and harmony; aural identification of intervals, chords, and rhythmic patterns; and exercises in musical memory and improvisation. Students entering the sequence take a test to determine the appropriate level of their first course. At the end of each course, students take a placement test to determine whether they may enter a higher level course. Courses may be repeated for credit, but each course may be counted toward the major only once.


MUSI 3332 Musicianship I

Lecture / Section 1 (Adam Carter): MWF / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH B012
Class Number: 10881

Lecture / Section 2 (Victoria Clark): MWF / 9:00-9:50 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 21857


MUSI 3334 Musicianship II

Lecture (Eli Stine): MWF / 12:00-12:50 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 10882


MUSI 3400 Ecoacoustics

Matthew Burtner
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 2:00-3:15 / OCH 107
Class Number: 13773

 

MUSI 3559 Making Art in/with Communities (New Course)

Peter Bussigel / Kathryn Schetlick
3.0 credits
Lecture/Section 1: T / 4:00-4:50 & R / 4:00-6:00 / Maury 113
Class Number: 20640

 

MUSI 3559 Women and Music (New Course)

Elizabeth Ozment
3.0 credits
Lecture/Section 2: TR / 3:30-5:00 / Maury 110
Class Number: 21158

This course examines women’s perspectives about music, and dominant perceptions of women’s participation in music. We will take a global approach to exploring to exploring women’s roles as creators, performers, patrons, and consumers of popular and art music traditions. We will read and discuss recent and sometimes controversial scholarship from the fields of musicology, ethnomusicology, feminist literary criticism, and cultural studies. The course will be organized topically, allowing for a comparative music study.

MUSI 3993 Independent Study

1.0-3.0 credits
Instructor permission and instructor number required to enroll.

MUSI 4510 Cultural and Historical Studies
Topic: Music of Multicultural America

Joel Rubin
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 11:00 am -12:15 pm / OCH B012
Class Number: 15030

“Music of Multicultural America” looks at American traditional and popular musics from a cross-cultural and multi-ethnic perspective. We will examine the traditions most often called “roots music,” including African-American blues and southern old-time string band music, which influenced the development of rock and roll and country and western. We will also study a wide range of other ethnic musical traditions, from Native American pow wows and Cajun to salsa, klezmer and Balkan-Gypsy-punk, which have influenced popular music-making of the past twenty-five years. Along the way we will treat a complex and shifting web of associated ideas, such as authenticity, heritage, nationalism, and multiculturalism, and the musical or music-marketing categories of folk, roots, indie rock, neo-cabaret, and world music. We will ask how “roots” traditions have fed into definitions of “American-ness” over the years, and whether recent trends represent signs of America’s transforming itself into a post-ethnic, post-racial society. This course is designed for music majors, but others may apply with instructor permission. For non-majors, musical literacy is not a requirement. It fulfills the Second Writing Requirement.

MUSI 4520 Critical Studies of Music
Topic: Music, Sound, and Embodiment

Fred Maus
3.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 2:00-3:15 / OCH 113
Class Number: 14005

 

MUSI 4535 Interactive Media
Topic: Mobile Interactive Computer Ensemble (MICE)

Peter Bussigel
3.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 6:00-7:15 pm / OCH B011
Class Number: 21162

Mobile Interactive Computer Ensemble (MICE) is an advanced seminar in composition, software programming and intermedia performance. The class explores the theoretical and practical aspects of composing and performing real-time interactive multimedia with computers. Emphasis is placed on gaining a deeper and more personal understanding of the possibilities of human-computer interaction in music and the arts. Students in the class form the Mobile Interactive Computer Ensemble (MICE) and create new works for the group to perform. Musicians are encouraged to join MICE, and this class meets a composition requirement for the Music Major. Creative and technology-oriented students from the other Arts Departments and Engineering are also encouraged to join the class as we will focus on intermedia approaches to live performance with technology.

MUSI 4545 Computer Applications in Music

Luke Dahl
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 4:00-5:15 pm / OCH B011
Class Number: 15786

Discussion Section (Jon Bellona): R / 2:00-2:50 / OCH B011
Class Number: 21290

This course focuses on understanding and implementing audio effects and using them for musical projects. We will cover the signal processing involved in audio effects such as delay, reverb, chorus, flanger, distortion and compression, and we will implement these effects as Audio Unit plugins by programming in C/C++. We will emphasize the musical application of our designs, and as a final project students will have the opportunity to create a unique new effect that addresses their own musical goals. Previous programming experience is helpful but not required, as we will cover the necessary fundamentals.

MUSI 4559 Performance Studies in Classical Music (New Course)

Peter D'Elia
2.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 12:30-1:45 pm / B012
Class Number: 21482

What is performance, and how does it convey meaning? Where does the musical work lie, and can we know authorial intention? What does research tell us about how classical music has been performed in the past, and how might this knowledge change our own performance choices and interpretive process? In this class, we will explore these and related questions from a variety of viewpoints, drawing from the field of Performance Studies as well as scholarship on score analysis and performance, recording analysis, and historical performance practice. In addition to reading, discussing and writing about these broad questions, the class will allow you to reflect on your own approach to performance and to undertake a practice-based performance research project.

MUSI 4620 Audio Visual Environments

Peter Bussigel
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 12:30-1:45 / Wilson Hall Makers Space
Class Number: 21180

This is a course in audiovisual composition and time-based new media. Over the course of the semester, you will create fixed video pieces, learn interactive & real-time audiovisual techniques, and explore sculptural & networked approaches to combining sound and light.

MUSI 4720 Instrumental Conducting II

Kate Tamarkin
3.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 11:00-12:15 / OCH 107
Class Number: 14451

This course is a continuation of MUSI 4710, and is open only by instructor permission to those who have not taken MUSI 4710.  It continues the study of the art and craft of instrumental conducting, focusing upon conducting and rehearsal techniques as applied to an orchestra.  It includes instrumental transpositions, score reading, and clef reading.  There is a strong focus upon the physical technique of conducting along with exploring the aspects of musicianship that go into forming a musical interpretation.

MUSI 4770 Choral Arranging

Michael Slon
3.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 2:00-3:15 / OCH B012
Class Number: 21181

This class will explore the art of writing for chorus and small vocal ensemble, and will aim at developing practical skills in creating and transcribing arrangements. Students will study a variety of examples from the repertoire, and attention will be paid to fundamentals of writing for the voice, setting text, etc. In addition the class will serve as workshop chorus, such that student arrangements can be performed and studied in the classroom.

Prerequisites: MUSI 3310 or Instructor permission. A basic knowledge of music theory, and a basic ability to sing from written sources will prove essential.

MUSI 4993: Independent Study

1.0 - 3.0 credits
Instructor permission and instructor number required to enroll

 

Spring 2017 Graduate Courses

MUSI 7509 Cultural and Historical Studies
Topic: Humor and Music

Michael Puri
3.0 credits 
Lecture: T / 2:00-4:30 pm / OCH S008
Class Number: 19885

As a rule, we don't take humor seriously enough. This seminar seeks to improve this situation by shining a spotlight on musical humor, one of its most powerful and pervasive manifestations. How does musical humor work? Where do we find it? What are the available theoretical frameworks for humor, and how might we apply them critically to an understanding of musical humor in particular? We will cast our net widely to answer these questions. Authors will include the likes of Bergson, Freud, Jameson, Hutcheon, Dyer, and Žižek, while topics will include irony, parody, pastiche, satire, camp, minstrelsy, the grotesque, the carnivalesque, and even seriousness itself--the straight man in the history of humor. Listenings will focus on Western classical music but will also incorporate other traditions as necessary. An ability to decipher and interpret musical scores will be helpful, but is not strictly required.

MUSI 7519 Current Studies in Research and Criticism

Karl Hagstrom Miller
3.0 credits 
Lecture: M / 2:00-4:30 pm / OCH S008
Class Number: 15864

 

MUSI 7523 Issues in Ethnomusicology

Noel Lobley
3.0 credits 
Lecture: W / 2:00-4:30 pm / OCH S008
Class Number: TBA

 

 

MUSI 7540 Digital Signal Processing for Musicians

Luke Dahl
3.0 credits
LectureM / 3:00-5:30 /OCH  B011
Class Number: 14692

As musicians and composers we frequently use software tools to modify digital sound. Our ability to effectively deploy these techniques can be improved by understanding what digital sound is, how sounds are changed by these processes, and how they work “under the hood.” Audio Digital Signal Processing (DSP) may seem like technical wizardry, but in this class we will begin to demystify the processes and terms.  What is the frequency domain and why is it important? How does a Fourier Transform work?  What is a filter, how is one built, and why do some of them have poles? Etc. The class will be both hands-on (we will be analyzing and modifying sounds by writing code in Matlab), and theoretical (which may require re-acquainting yourself with some math).


MUSI 7547 Materials of Contemporary Music

Ted Coffey
3.0 Credits
Lecture: R / 5:00-7:30 pm / OCH B011
Class Number: 19886

 

Spring 2017 Ensembles

MUBD 2601 Basketball Band

Andrew Koch
2.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 6:00-8:00 pm / Hunter Smith Band Building
Class Number: 12595

The Basketball Band performs at every home men's and women's basketball game at the John Paul Jones Arena and all post season tournament games. Much of the music must be performed memorized. New music is introduced on a weekly basis. Students enrolling in Basketball Band must be a member of the current year's marching band course (MUBD 2610, 2620, 2630, or 2640).

MUEN 2600 Concert Band

Andrew Koch
1.0 credits
Lecture: W / 6:25-8:45 pm / Hunter Smith Band Building
Class Number: 10829

 

MUEN 2690, 3690 and 4690 African Music and Dance Ensemble

Michelle Kisliuk
2.0 credits
Lecture: TR / 5:30-7:15 pm / OCH 107

(registration number depends on student seniority in the ensemble)

MUEN 2690
Class Number: 13929

MUEN 3690
Class Number: 13491

MUEN 4690
Class Number: 13129

The African Music and Dance Ensemble is a practical, hands-on course focusing on several music/dance forms from Western and Central Africa with performances during and at the end of the semester. Though no previous experience with music or dance is required, we will give special attention to developing tight ensemble dynamics, aural musicianship, and a polymetric sensibility. Concentration, practice, and faithful attendance are required of each class member, the goal being to develop an ongoing U.Va. African Music and Dance Ensemble.

MUEN 3600 Jazz Ensemble

John D'earth
2.0 credits
Lecture: MR / 7:30-9:30 pm / OCH B018
Class Number: 10830

Led by internationally recognized jazz trumpeter/composer John D'earth, the Jazz Ensemble is a full-sized jazz big band, whose focus includes “head arrangements” group improvisation, world music and original compositions from within the band, along with music ranging from swing to bop to fusion. You'll gain valuable experience in ensemble playing and in the art of solo improvisation, and may take private instruction in jazz improvisation, perform in small combos and participate in jazz workshops held by such major figures as Michael Brecker, John Abercrombi, Dave Leibman, Bob Moses, Clark Terry, and Joe Henderson.

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

MUEN 3610: Charlottesville Symphony at the University of Virginia

Kate Tamarkin, Conductor
2.0 credits

Strings

Lecture / Section 100: W / 7:30-10:00 pm / OCH 101
Class Number: 10831

Sectionals: M / 5:30-7:00 pm

Section 101: Pete Spaar (Double Bass) / OCH B012
Class Number: 10833

Section 103: Ayn Balija (Viola) / OCH 113
Class Number: 10834

Section 104: Daniel Sender (Violin) / OCH 107
Class Number: 10835

Section 105: David Sariti (Violin) / OCH B018
Class Number: 10836

Section 102: Adam Carter (Cello) / OCH S004
Class Number: 12829

Brass / Woodwinds / Percussion

Lecture / Section 200: W / 7:30-10:00 pm / OCH 101
Class Number: 10832

Sectionals: W / 5:15-6:15 pm

Section 201: Elizabeth Roberts (Bassoon) / TBA
Class Number: 10837

Section 202: Shawn Earle (Clarinet) / TBA
Class Number: 10838

Section 203: Kelly Sulick (Flute) / OCH B019
Class Number: 10839

Section 204: Katy Ambrose (Horn) / OCH 113
Class Number: 10840

Section 205: Kelly Peral (Oboe) / TBA
Class Number: 10841

Section 206: I-Jen Fang (Percussion) / B018
Class Number: 10842

Section 207: Rachel Duncan (Trumpet) / 107
Class Number: 10843

Section 208: Nate Lee (Trombone) / B012
Class Number: 10844

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

MUEN 3620 Wind Ensemble

Bill Pease
2.0 credits
Lecture: M / 6:25-8:45 pm / Hunter Smith Band Building / Room 200
Class Number: 11450

The Wind Ensemble is a 45-member ensemble that features the most outstanding brass, woodwind, and percussion players at the University. The focus of this ensemble is to explore new literature as well as perform the masterworks of the wind band era. The wind ensemble also works with outstanding guest performers and conductors. This group is predominately made up of non-music majors who enjoy the genre of the wind band. Open to all University of Virginia students, auditions are held prior to the start of each semester. For more information on the Wind Ensemble, please visit our webpage at: http://music.virginia.edu/wind-ensemble.

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

MUEN 3630, Section 1: Percussion Chamber Ensemble

I-Jen Fang
1.0 credit
Lecture: T / 9:30-10:00 am / OCH B018
Class Number: 10845

Restricted to Instructor permission by audition on first day of class.

Re-established in spring 2005 by I-Jen Fang, principal timpanist and percussionist with Charlottesville Symphony, the Percussion Ensemble is a chamber group that performs literature ranging from classical transcriptions to contemporary music. The ensemble draws upon a large family of pitched and non-pitched percussion instruments, and the number of players and amount of equipment varies greatly from piece to piece. Music reading skills and basic percussion technique on all percussion instruments is required. Previous percussion ensemble experience is highly recommended. If you are interested in joining please contact I-Jen Fang.

MUEN 3630, Section 2: Woodwind Ensemble

Elizabeth Roberts
1.0 credit
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 10846

Explore, rehearse and perform woodwind chamber music, including both standard and more obscure works. Focus on developing chamber music playing skills, learning the tendencies of the woodwind instruments, developing musicianship, and enjoying making and sharing music! Instructor permission and audition required.

MUEN 3630, Section 3: Horn Ensemble

Katy Ambrose
1.0 credit
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 10847

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

 

MUEN 3630, Section 5: Flute Ensemble

Kelly Sulick
1.0 credit
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 10848

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

MUEN 3630, Section 7: Woodwind Quintet

Shawn Earle
1.0 credit
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 10850

Instructor permission by audition.

MUEN 3630, Section 8: Brass Quintet

Rachel Duncan
1.0 credit
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 10851

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

MUEN 3630: Jazz Chamber Ensemble

1.0 credit, Instructor permission by audition.

Lecture / Section 10: Pete Spaar / R / 5:30-7:00 pm / OCH B018
Class Number: 10852

Lecture / Section 11: Mike Rosensky / T / 5:30-7:00 pm / OCH B018
Class Number: 11598

Lecture / Section 12:  Jeff Decker / F / 2:00-3:30 pm / OCH B018
Class Number: 10854

Lecture / Section 13: Pete Spaar / F / 12:30-2:00 pm / OCH B018
Class Number: 10855

MUEN 3630, Chamber Music Ensemble

1.0 credit, Instructor permission by audition.

Lecture: / Section 14: John Mayhood / TBA
Class Number: 10856

Lecture: / Section 15: Daniel Sender / TBA
Class Number: 10857

Lecture: / Section 16: David Sariti / TBA
Class Number: 10858

Lecture: / Section 17: Ayn Balija / TBA
Class Number: 10859

Lecture: / Section 18: Adam Carter / TBA
Class Number: 10860

MUEN 3630, Section 19: Trombone Ensemble

Nate Lee
1.0 credit
Lecture: TBA
Class Number: 13130

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition. Contact Nathaniel Lee to schedule an audition.

MUEN 3640: Klezmer Ensemble

Joel Rubin
2.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 7:30-9:30 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 14095

Klezmer, originally the ritual and celebratory music of the Yiddish-speaking Jews of Eastern Europe, was brought to North America by immigrants around the turn of the last century. Since the 1970s, a dynamic revival of this tradition has been taking place in America and beyond. Klezmer’s recent popularity has brought it far from its roots in medieval minstrelsy and Jewish ritual and into the sphere of mainstream culture. The traditional klezmer style presents the experienced instrumentalist with a range of technical challenges with its characteristic note bends, rubati, Baroque-style embellishments and other micro-improvisational techniques, opening up a world of expressive possibilities not available to them from either classical music or jazz. This music was passed on orally from generation to generation, and many of the ornaments which are so integral to the klezmer sound can only be approximated by Western staff notation – not to mention the patterns of improvised variation which are the cornerstone of the style. There will therefore be an emphasis on learning by ear as much as possible, but we will be using music in the form of lead sheets and other written instructional materials to supplement sound examples.

The class focuses on the study and performance of various traditions, including the klezmer traditions of New York between the two world wars, 19th century Eastern Europe, as well as original contemporary compositions. Emphasis will be on learning by ear, improvisation within a modal context, and learning to develop a cohesive ensemble sound. Concentration, practice, and good attendance are required of each ensemble member.

Admission is by audition during first class period of semester or prior to that, by appointment with the instructor.

MUEN 3645: Bluegrass Workshop

Richard Will
1.0 credit, Instructor permission
Lecture: T / 7:00-8:00 pm / OCH B018
Class Number: 14130

This course seeks to develop the playing, singing, and improvising skills necessary for the idomatic performance of bluegrass music, while also providing an opportunity for discussion of its origins and development.  Appropriate for experienced players working to improve their knowledge or for players versed in other genres to learn new styles.

MUEN 3646: Bluegrass Band

Richard Will
1.0 credit, Instructor permission
Lecture: T / 6:00-7:00 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 21183

This course seeks to develop the advanced playing, singing, improvising, and collaborating skills necessary to perform in a traditional bluegrass band, along with knowledge of bluegrass history and repertoire.

Prerequisite: MUEN 3645

MUEN 3650: University Singers

Michael Slon
2.0 credits
Lecture: MW / 3:30-5:30 pm / OCH 101
Class Number: 10862

The University Singers is the University's premier SATB ensemble, performing a cappella and accompanied choral literature ranging from chant to the works of contemporary composers. Past repertoire has included Bach's Mass in B minor, Orff's Carmina Burana, the Duruflé Requiem, and Bernstein's Chichester Psalms, as well as shorter a cappella works. Recent trips have taken the group to Atlanta, Charlotte, Chicago, Cincinnati, New Orleans, New York City, Philadelphia, and the National Cathedral in Washington D.C., as well as the campuses of other American universities for collaborative concerts. The group has also been heard on European tours in England, Italy, Belgium, Germany, and Switzerland. Recent highlights have included performances with the Charlottesville Symphony at the University of Virginia, a concert and workshop with Bobby McFerrin, and a concert tour of the Southeastern U.S.

Students in the University Singers come from all six of UVA's undergraduate schools, including Arts and Sciences, Education, and Engineering, as well as several of the University's graduate and professional schools. Together, they enjoy an esprit de corps that arises from the pursuit of musical excellence and the camaraderie the singers develop offstage.

All singers at the University - undergraduates, graduate students, staff, and faculty are encouraged to audition. University Singers is offered for two hours academic credit. Michael Slon, who has conducted choruses at the Oberlin Conservatory and Indiana University School of Music, is the conductor. For more information on the University Singers, please visit our webpage

Restricted to: Instructor permission by audition.

MUEN 3651: Chamber Singers

Michael Slon
2.0 credits
Lecture: F / 1:00-3:15 pm / OCH 107
Class Number: 10861

Chamber Singers is a select ensemble drawn from the University Singers. The ensemble meets once a week and focuses on music for chamber choir ranging from the Renaissance to contemporary pieces. Recent performances have included the Monteverdi Mass for 4 voices (1651), Britten'sHymn to St. Cecilia, and Bach's Cantata 150, as well as contemporary works by Meredith Monk and Eric Whitacre, and arrangements of classic jazz standards by Harold Arlen, Jerome Kern, and the King's Singers. Interested singers will be considered for the chamber ensemble as part of their University Singers audition. For more information, please visit our webpage.

Restricted to: Instructor permission

MUEN 3657 Voice for Stage

Pam Beasley / Brenda Patterson
2.0 credits
Lecture: R / 3:30-5:30 pm / OCH 107
Class Number: 21182

A vocal performance class in which students alternately direct and perform in selected scenes. This course allows students to deepen their performing skills through alternating the roles of performer and director.  Students will study assigned texts, scores and source materials from musical theater, opera and song and will then develop directorial and presentational/design concepts for productions, directing each other in short scenes.  Prerequisite: Intermediate to advanced level/experience with solo singing and acting. instructor Permission Required.

MUEN 3670: Early Music Ensemble: Baroque Orchestra

David Sariti
2.0 credit
Lecture: R / 7:00-9:00 pm / OCH 113
Class Number: 11451

The Baroque Orchestra, directed by David Sariti, offers students the rare opportunity to perform music of the 17th and 18th centuries on the instruments for which it was written, at low pitch. Students use period instruments from the University's extensive collection, receiving personal instruction on the special techniques necessary, and must be accomplished on their modern counterparts.

MUEN 3680: New Music Ensemble

I-Jen Fang
1.0 credit
Lecture: R / 3:30-5:30 pm / OCH B018
Class Number: 10863

Restricted to Instructor permission by audition on first day of class.

Performance of vocal and instrumental music of the twentieth century.

A one-credit course at the University of Virginia, the New Music Ensemble explores and performs exciting music of our time. The ensemble consists of dedicated instrumentalists, singers and UVa performance faculty. We perform a wide variety of contemporary music suitable to our instrumentation, including new works created by UVa composers.

The New Music Ensemble seeks dedicated instrumentalists and singers to explore and perform a wide variety of contemporary music. To audition, come to the first class with your instrument. If you are interested in joining please contact I-Jen Fang.

Open to UVA students, community musicians and advanced high school students.

 

Summer 2017 Academic Courses

Session I - May 15-June 10

MUSI 2390 / 3390 Introduction to Music and Computers

Ted Coffey
3.0 credits
Lecture: MTWRF / 1:00-3:15 pm / New Cabell Hall 207
MUSI 2390 Class Number: 12164
MUSI 3390 Class Number: 12388

Introduction to the use of computers in music composition, with hands-on experience. At the 2000 level, the course is appropriate for non-majors and has no prerequisites. At the 3000 level, the course is appropriate for majors and other students who commit to advanced work.

 

Session II - June 12-July 8

MUSI 2070 / 4508 Popular Music / Topics in American Music

Kyle Chattleton
3.0 credits
Lecture: MTWRF / 1:00-3:15 pm / NCH 407
MUSI 2070 Class Number: 12722
MUSI 4508 Class Number: 12387

History, analysis, and reception of popular music in the US from minstrelsy to Miley Cyrus. At the 2000 level, the course is appropriate for non-majors and has no prerequisites. At the 4000 level, the course is appropriate for majors and other students who commit to advanced work.

MUSI 2559 / 4535 Composing with Sound and Video / Interactive Media

Eli Stine
3.0 credits
Lecture: MTWRF / 11:30-1:45 pm / NCH 268
MUSI 2559 Class Number: 12700
MUSI 4535 Class Number: 12211

History of electronic sound, video, and their relationship; basic audio and video editing skills; hands-on experience through creative projects. We will create sound design for film, video art (video-recorded and/or animated materials), and realtime multimedia projects. No experience with audio or video technologies required, though it is welcome. At the 2000 level, the course is appropriate for non-majors and has no prerequisites. At the 4000 level, the course is appropriate for majors and other students who commit to advanced work.

 

Session III - July 10-August 4

MUSI 1010 Introduction to Music

Craig Comen
3.0 credits
Lecture: MTWRF / 10:30 am - 12:45 pm / NCH 309
Class Number: 12165

An introduction to the academic study of music. The class focuses primarily on the history of Western classical music, allowing us to develop a technical vocabulary to discuss music from many different repertories. We’ll explore the cultural frameworks of listening communities from the past, and develop a historical understanding of how we engage with music in the present. No previous musical experience required.

MUSI 2340 Learn to Groove

Robert Jospe
2.0 credits
Lecture: MTWRF / 1:00-2:30 pm / Brooks Hall 103
Class Number: 12164

Study of rhythmic patterns associated with rhythms from West African, the Caribbean, Brazil, and the United States, through theory and performance.

MUSI 2559 / 4547 Sound Art

Rachel Devorah
3.0 credits
Lecture: MTWRF / 1:00-3:15 pm / TBA
MUSI 2559 Class Number: 12701
MUSI 4547 Class Number: 12702

Historical survey of sound art; taxonomy of different sound art practices; use of emergent technologies in the discipline. A studio course with hands-on learning of the diverse skills needed to realize sound art works and develop methods of critique. At the 2000 level, the course is appropriate for non-majors and has no prerequisites. At the 4000 level, the course is appropriate for majors and other students who commit to advanced work.

4000-level students will create an original work for an exhibit at the end of the course.

 

Session III - July 10-August 4

MUSI 1010 Introduction to Music

Craig Comen
3.0 credits
Lecture: MTWRF / 10:30 am - 12:45 pm / NCH 309
Class Number: 12165

An introduction to the academic study of music. The class focuses primarily on the history of Western classical music, allowing us to develop a technical vocabulary to discuss music from many different repertories. We’ll explore the cultural frameworks of listening communities from the past, and develop a historical understanding of how we engage with music in the present. No previous musical experience required.

MUSI 2340 Learn to Groove

Robert Jospe
2.0 credits
Lecture: MTWRF / 1:00-2:30 pm / Brooks Hall 103
Class Number: 12164

Study of rhythmic patterns associated with rhythms from West African, the Caribbean, Brazil, and the United States, through theory and performance.

Address

McIntire Department of Music
112 Old Cabell Hall
P.O. Box 400176 Charlottesville, VA 22904-4176

Email: music@virginia.edu